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How Will the Travel Industry Reinvent Itself Post-Coronavirus?

This mountain range north of New York City is experiencing a tourism renaissance.

The stretch of desert north of Santa Fe, N.M. — cut through by the Rio Chama and the Rio Grande — is rich with history. Over centuries, many Native American and Spanish place names have identified its adobe villages and geological formations, and in the late 1980s, the state’s tourism industry gave it yet another title: O’Keeffe Country, after American modernist painter Georgia O’Keeffe. With her New Mexico paintings, she helped introduce the region’s surreal landscapes to the world.

Nairobia's, Mrs. Wilkes, The Grey.

The Mississippi Delta is a region rich with blues music, civil rights sites, and agribusiness. It’s also the spiritual home of a beloved snack called the hot tamale.

Sixty-five years after the lynching of a child from Chicago, a new mobile app paves the way for civil rights tourism at the local sites central to his story.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s mentor designed a sprawling ranch in the West; Ted Turner & Jane Fonda came to its rescue 

America’s small-town, family-owned pierogi restaurants are handed down from generation to generation. How long can they survive?

These Tamales From the Mississippi Delta Are Worth Selling Your Soul

S C I E N C E

Recent studies indicate SARS-CoV-2’s impacts on the brain—from memory lapses and depression to strokes and seizures—could plague survivors for years, decades, even generations.

Inundated with tourists fleeing lockdowns, Savannah, Georgia’s fight against COVID-19 has been an uphill battle. New vaccine trials offer a source of hope—and another battlefront.

Posing as a harmless messenger molecule, the coronavirus persuades human cells to do its bidding. Treatments will need to unmask it as an intruder—or even deceive it right back.

While Trump’s reported fondness for an unproven plant extract as COVID-19 cure may be just his latest deranged fantasy, some experts say the U.S. is sleeping on plausible options.

So far in 2020, the dementia and Alzheimer’s fatality rate is nearly 20% higher than average from recent years. Being Patient takes a closer look at just why this surge in deaths is occurring:

A medical scandal in Toledo, Ohio is a bold reminder of how important a second opinion on a dementia diagnosis can be.

A research team in the Republic of Korea has made a discovery that could lead to a simple new method for diagnosing Alzheimer’s: Testing your snot.
 

Certain prescription drugs carry special risks for people living with dementia and may not help their symptoms, but many doctors are prescribing them anyway.
 

The NFL considers concussions serious injuries, but that has not always been the case. Now, Black players who sustained repeated brain injuries during their NFL careers are suing the league over claims of racially discriminatory treatment.

A settlement in a false advertising lawsuit involving brain health supplement Prevagen could be one of the largest consumer class settlements in the U.S., setting a precedent for better regulation against false advertising in the dietary supplements industry.

A new study has found that people who engaged in learning activities as children — studying foreign languages, being read to, looking at atlases, books and other learning materials, playing games that stimulate the mind — are more likely to have slower rates of cognitive decline later in life.

B U S I N E S S

Social distancing prompts a traditionally low-tech industry toward VR, drones and robotics at breakneck speed.

A primer on self-cleaning and anti-microbial surfaces.

According to the U.S. Labor Department’s latest jobs report, as of May, more than 15 million Americans were on furlough. Here are their stories.

Microbiologists and other experts chime in on the latest technology, from high-grade air filtration systems to HVAC retrofits for bio-polar ionization.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, plastic partitions between desks are “hot right now.” But do they work?

 
 
 
 
 

longform writing featured by:

The job promises flexible hours, a connection to nature and irresistible Instagram content. But is it recession-proof?

Some modern-day prospectors make thousands of dollars selling precious stones they dug up themselves.

What does the artisanal ax craze say about what we’re chopping?

She wanted a cat that looked like a tiger. Meet the toyger.

Why settle for a tea cozy when you can make knitwear fit for a nuclear winter?

Confined to their homes, Americans are kneading dough.

Step aside, goat yoga. The chic way to unwind now is fly fishing.

T R A V E L / F O O D / L I F E S T Y L E

Issue 13 print feature Looking Ahead: How Will the Travel Industry Reinvent Itself Post-Coronavirus?

For centuries, people lit beacons to unite across distances. England keeps this ancient tradition alive.

Some are setting standards for better treatment of mushing dogs

This mountain range north of New York City is experiencing a tourism renaissance.

The stretch of desert north of Santa Fe, N.M. — cut through by the Rio Chama and the Rio Grande — is rich with history. Over centuries, many Native American and Spanish place names have identified its adobe villages and geological formations, and in the late 1980s, the state’s tourism industry gave it yet another title: O’Keeffe Country, after American modernist painter Georgia O’Keeffe. With her New Mexico paintings, she helped introduce the region’s surreal landscapes to the world.

Nairobia's, Mrs. Wilkes, The Grey.

The Mississippi Delta is a region rich with blues music, civil rights sites, and agribusiness. It’s also the spiritual home of a beloved snack called the hot tamale.

Sixty-five years after the lynching of a child from Chicago, a new mobile app paves the way for civil rights tourism at the local sites central to his story.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s mentor designed a sprawling ranch in the West; Ted Turner & Jane Fonda came to its rescue 

America’s small-town, family-owned pierogi restaurants are handed down from generation to generation. How long can they survive?

These Tamales From the Mississippi Delta Are Worth Selling Your Soul

At Palmetto Bluff, Dr. Mary Socci cares for 12,000 years of human history

S C I E N C E

Recent studies indicate SARS-CoV-2’s impacts on the brain—from memory lapses and depression to strokes and seizures—could plague survivors for years, decades, even generations.

Inundated with tourists fleeing lockdowns, Savannah, Georgia’s fight against COVID-19 has been an uphill battle. New vaccine trials offer a source of hope—and another battlefront.

Posing as a harmless messenger molecule, the coronavirus persuades human cells to do its bidding. Treatments will need to unmask it as an intruder—or even deceive it right back.

While Trump’s reported fondness for an unproven plant extract as COVID-19 cure may be just his latest deranged fantasy, some experts say the U.S. is sleeping on plausible options.

So far in 2020, the dementia and Alzheimer’s fatality rate is nearly 20% higher than average from recent years. Being Patient takes a closer look at just why this surge in deaths is occurring:

A medical scandal in Toledo, Ohio is a bold reminder of how important a second opinion on a dementia diagnosis can be.

A research team in the Republic of Korea has made a discovery that could lead to a simple new method for diagnosing Alzheimer’s: Testing your snot.
 

Certain prescription drugs carry special risks for people living with dementia and may not help their symptoms, but many doctors are prescribing them anyway.
 

The NFL considers concussions serious injuries, but that has not always been the case. Now, Black players who sustained repeated brain injuries during their NFL careers are suing the league over claims of racially discriminatory treatment.

A settlement in a false advertising lawsuit involving brain health supplement Prevagen could be one of the largest consumer class settlements in the U.S., setting a precedent for better regulation against false advertising in the dietary supplements industry.

A new study has found that people who engaged in learning activities as children — studying foreign languages, being read to, looking at atlases, books and other learning materials, playing games that stimulate the mind — are more likely to have slower rates of cognitive decline later in life.

LONGREADS EDITOR'S PICK

FEATURED IN THE SUNDAY LONG READ

Till was murdered 65 years ago. Sites of commemoration across the Mississippi Delta still struggle with what’s history and what’s hearsay.

FEATURED IN THE SUNDAY LONG READ

DISCUSSED: New York City's Hart Island, John and Jane Does, Dutch Funeral Poetry, The Department of Public Charities and Correction, Fish Rendering, Hog Bristle, Hoofprints of Satan, The Eagle Scouts,...

LONGREADS EDITOR'S PICK

At 6 a.m., the sun shoots through the back window of the Amtrak train car like an orange spotlight. Outside, the rails glow against the flat plains of western Kansas. Maybe the light woke me. Or maybe, after four or five times of restlessly opening my eyes, it just happens to be dawn.

GUARDIAN CITIES TOP 10 MOST READ OF THE YEAR

Dispatch from Kingston, New York

The Alabama-born artist's 'lynching paintings' goes on view in Birmingham for the first time

A Santa Fe artist’s work opens eyes to drilling and fracking in the Southwest

Inside Georgia O'Keeffe's fallout shelter 

LONGREADS EDITOR'S PICK

Homeownership in the age of the Instagram “travel influencer”

How the New York City Health Department Separated Immigrant Families During the 1901 Smallpox Outbreak

A gentrifying Atlanta mill town neighborhood through the eyes of photographer Oraein Catledge

LONGREADS EDITOR'S PICK

BITTER SOUTHERNER BEST STORIES OF THE YEAR

The closure of Desposito's Seafood Restaurant on the Wilmington River in Savannah is the end of an era for local seafood.

LONGREADS EDITOR'S PICK

The people of Wilcox County, Alabama, remember Sheriff Lummie Jenkins as a god or a monster—it just depends on who you ask

Long after their iconic American quilts caught the art world's attention, the Gee's Bend artisans are taking control of their legacy.

With “America’s Playground,” artist Derrick Adams evokes the damage caused by Interstate 95 as planners routed it through Miami’s Overtown neighborhood.

Despite the global fame of its quilts, the rural hamlet of Gee’s Bend (now Boykin) is deeply impoverished. Boosters say making it an official town could change that

B U S I N E S S

Social distancing prompts a traditionally low-tech industry toward VR, drones and robotics at breakneck speed.

A primer on self-cleaning and anti-microbial surfaces.

According to the U.S. Labor Department’s latest jobs report, as of May, more than 15 million Americans were on furlough. Here are their stories.

Microbiologists and other experts chime in on the latest technology, from high-grade air filtration systems to HVAC retrofits for bio-polar ionization.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, plastic partitions between desks are “hot right now.” But do they work?

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© 2020 Alexandra Marvar